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Plagiarism query on Star column

Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 04:56:36 am

A little bird says that the Star has halted a column by a contributor after allegations of plagiarism. No confirmation of this was available last night, but the informant says there was a tip-off to the editor that chunks of an article published on Saturday were remarkably similar to an undated article published by British property web site OurProperty.co.uk under the byline of Hannah Shanks. The Star article carries the byline of Dawn Jeremiah, a broadcasting and marketing personality.

The articles are more than merely similar: of the 24 paragraphs in the Star article, 17 paragraphs appeared to have been lifted, word-for-word, with the rest being remarks by the contributor interspersed in between. The Star did not credit the UK web site, nor did it give any indication that the material it published may not have been original.

(The UK article is undated but to my recollection, it isn’t the first time these types of articles have been queried on grounds of plagiarism. Offhand I recall one similar case of a property article last year.)

Strangely, the weekend Star article was still available online. Perhaps someone will follow up on this later this morning. (11am: It’s been taken down, without explanation. The link now leads to an empty page.)

In the meantime, here’s a side-by-side comparison of the two articles:

The Star article
Byline: Dawn Jeremiah
Let’s say one morning you wake up and realise that, yes, buying your first home is the right thing to do for yourself.

You’re tired of throwing away money on rent and figure that it’s time to get into a home of your own.

In most cases, first-time home buyers would opt for apartments due to convenience and the abundance of choices in accordance to one’s budget.

Apartments enjoy a reputation synonymous with city living, stylish open-plan space and great views.

But choosing and buying an apartment can be an arduous task (or maybe it was just me), and there are plenty of things you need to think about at each and every stage of the investment process.

This guide is what I put together to help highlight those key points you need to be thinking of at each and every stage of your quest for the perfect apartment. It was what I used to consider my purchase.

Spend some time thinking about the kind of apartment you’re looking for. This will help you narrow down your options and enable you to determine some ‘must haves’ in your apartment choices.

The Star column that was queried - it was taken down this morning

Location, location, location! – Narrow down the areas that you are most interested in living in, and make a list of these locations. Similarly, make a note of all the areas you definitely don’t want to live. This way, property agents will know immediately which properties to offer and which to discard. This process narrows down your search and save you time when viewing.

• Money matters – Consider your finances carefully and decide on a maximum budget – narrowing down your search field in this way will ensure that you only view properties you can afford. Don’t forget to bear in mind your income and outgoings – factoring in not just the monthly payments, but the apartment’s montly service charges as well.

• Space – How much space will you need in your apartment? How many bedrooms? How big a kitchen? Do you need an office?

• Style – Studio apartments merge all your living space into one area, while open-plan design means that your kitchen, dining area and living room will be contained in one open space. Do you want separate rooms within the apartment? Would studio living be too cramped? For me, I had to give up on the idea of an open-concept kitchen mainly because I placed top priority on my apartment’s location and the apartment that suited my budget did not have an open-concept kitchen.

• Specifics – Are there certain criteria on which you are unwilling to compromise? Do you want wooden floors? High ceilings? An open-plan design? Designated parking spaces? In my case, besides the location being a priority, I wanted to have the smallest room in the apartment to be right next to the master bedroom. That way, I would be able to hack the wall to create an opening for my walk-in wardrobe.

It would be pointless for me to look at layouts where the smallest room would be at one end of the apartment, and the master bedroom be at the other end of the apartment.

The middle room would be too big to house my wardrobe and the smallest room would have been too small for my guest room and office.

Things to look out for

1. Noise – If you’re seriously thinking of investing in a particular apartment, take the time to research those living above and below as well as next-door to your property.

A week into your new apartment-life is not the time to discover a neighbour’s penchant for heavy metal or playing the drums!

2. Accessibility – Take a minute to think of those who will be visiting you at home – are there people for whom access could be a problem? Is there a functional lift for older visitors or family?

3. Outside Space – One of the sacrifices of apartment living can be the loss of outdoor space. I’m not so much of an outdoors person, but I made sure the apartment I purchased had a reasonably-sized balcony.

4. Pets – If you have pets, consider them in your property search.

This can be a major consideration for those wishing to move into an apartment, as you must be fair to both your pets and your neighbours.

Is your dog’s barking likely to irritate neighbours? Will you be able to give the pet adequate fresh air and exercise?

When you’ve found an apartment you’re really keen on, you may want to ask around people who live there or nearby to ensure there are no hidden problems which may affect your interest.

These efforts in research goes a long way in giving you peace of mind, should you finally decide to put in an offer, and can help you to avoid making an unsound investment.

I was passively looking at properties and being indecisive for three years before making a choice and sticking to it.

OurProperty.co.uk

Byline: Hannah Stark – Editor
Apartments enjoy a prestigious reputation synonymous with vibrant city living, stylish open-plan space and great views. But choosing and buying an apartment can be an arduous task, and there are plenty of things you need to think about at each and every stage of the investment process. The issues you need to consider when buying an apartment are often fundamental to the unique apartment experience, so it’s a good idea to really get to grips with your chosen property type before hitting the streets in search of your perfect pad. This guide will help to highlight those key points you need to be thinking of at each and every stage of your quest for the perfect apartment.

Before you Begin

Spend some time thinking about the kind of apartment you’re looking for. This will help you narrow down your options and enable you to determine some ‘must haves’ in your apartment choices. Why not designate a file or specific notepad for relevant ideas, lists, notes and criteria to help you organise your ideas? This could really help you keep on top of your thoughts during the planning, hunting, viewing and buying process. You might want to keep the following in mind when narrowing down your apartment choices:

Location, Location, Location! – Narrow down the areas that you are most interested in living in, and make a list of these locations. Similarly, make a note of all the areas you definitely don’t want to live. This way, any agents you approach will know straightaway which properties to offer and which to discard. This process will help narrow down your search area and save you time when both searching and viewing.

Money Matters – Consider your finances carefully and decide on a maximum budget – narrowing down your search field in this way will ensure that you only view properties you can afford! Don’t forget to bear in mind your income and outgoings – factoring in bills and general living expenses will help you be more realistic about your options.

Space – How much space will you need in your apartment? How many bedrooms? How big a kitchen? Do you need an office? Set yourself some rough criteria for potential properties, so you can present your checklist to estate agents and help them to search for properties more effectively.

StyleEstate agents use certain design terms with which you need to be familiar when searching for your apartment: Studio apartments merge all your living space into one area, while open-plan design means that your kitchen, dining area and living room will be contained in one open space. Consider your thoughts on these styles of apartment – do you want separate rooms within the apartment? Would studio living be too cramped for you?

Specifics – Are there certain criteria on which you are unwilling to compromise? Do you want wooden floors? High ceilings? An open-plan design? Designated parking spaces?

Finding your apartment

So, you’ve narrowed down your options: location, budget, apartment size and must-haves – now it’s time to start searching! More and more properties are being listed on the internet, so why not get online and start searching?

(…seven paragraphs removed …)

Things to Look Out For

While the above points are vital for a successful property viewing, there are a few further points you need to be aware of when viewing an apartment. Apartment living can come hand in hand with unique property issues that can work both for and against you. Try to bear in mind the following apartment-specific considerations as you view properties.

Noise is a key consideration when investing in an apartment. Wooden floors may look chic and stylish, but they can also make for noisy neighbours! If you’re seriously thinking of investing in a particular apartment, take the time to research those living above and below as well as next-door to your property. A week into your new apartment-life is not the time to discover a neighbour’s penchant for heavy metal or playing the drums!

Accessibility can be an issue in an apartment block. Take a minute to think of those who will be visiting you at home – are there people for whom access could be a problem? Is there a functional lift for older visitors or family? Simple considerations such as shopping trips may help you to better envisage the practicalities of apartment life.

Outside Space One of the major sacrifices of apartment living can be the loss of outdoor space.Consider this sacrifice carefully, and if you find the loss too daunting, ask your agent about apartments with balconies, roof terraces or even shared gardens. Alternatively, check the surrounding areas for public parks or footpaths.

Pets If you have pets, consider them in your property search. This can be a major consideration for those wishing to move into an apartment, as you must be fair to both your pets and your neighbours. Is your dog’s barking likely to irritate neighbours? Will you be able to give the pet adequate fresh air and exercise?

When you’ve found an apartment you’re really interested in, you may want to have a survey carried out on the property to ensure there are no hidden problems which may affect your interest. These surveys offer you peace of mind should you finally decide to put in an offer, and can help you to avoid making an unsound investment. Once you’re satisfied that the property is up to standard, you’re free to make an offer.

Making an Offer

(…One paragraph removed…)

Having made your apartment choices, viewed potential properties, chosen an apartment and made your offer, you’re well on your way to stylish, chic apartment-living! The key considerations of apartment life listed above are designed to help you at every stage of your apartment-buying process. Good luck!

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49 Comments
  1. Kim permalink
    Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 12:57:43 pm 12:57

    What do you expect from the Star (as well as the NST) newspapers.

  2. Prem Das permalink
    Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 16:20:24 pm 16:20

    This is sheer laziness more than wanton dishonesty. There is nothing there in the article that is beyond her capabilities.

    A shortcut which has earned her a long walk of shame.

    • Jenny permalink
      Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 16:47:12 pm 16:47

      How would u know it’s sheer laziness? Please check her previous articles to see if she has done the same before.

  3. Tecky permalink
    Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 16:22:04 pm 16:22

    The quality of this paper reflects that of those who control it – whether in terms of competence, integrity or simple decency in its reporting. But I won’t use the ‘w’ word here lah …

  4. ram permalink
    Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 16:39:42 pm 16:39

    Star has about 1.2 million readers according to a latest poll.The STAR was proudly showing off this figure to boost its advertisement market.I wonder what would all these readers have to say of this “lifting and pasting” articles.The CEO of STAR press has been elected into the world body I wonder how he feels about this.Whatever it is the lifted article is informative.The author should have acknowledged the source.Forgiven.

  5. Tue 2012-Sep-4 @ MYT 21:38:09 pm 21:38

    As stated, the writer of the plagiarised article is a contributor. Action has already been taken, namely her column has been axed. For “Kim” and “Tecky” to make sweeping statements as these brave souls have done above, I think it speaks more about their characters than whether the rest of the hundreds of employees in The Star such as its team of reporters, editors and sub-editors do their work with any “decency, integrity or competence”. – Comment written by Chin Mui Yoon, reporter with The Star.

    • Kim permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 09:28:41 am 09:28

      Chin Mui Yoon, what “decency, integrity or competence” are you talking about. It has now been made clear that this is not the first time that the contributor has resorted to what she has done. How’s that for integrity. Any decent editor or sub-editor of your newspaper would have sensed what was going on. And how’s that for competency. I have nothing personal against the contributor as I don’t even know her but I think that as a subscriber of your newspaper, I have a little right to make some comments regarding your newspaper without my character being called into question.

    • Lennonist permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 15:10:03 pm 15:10

      Chin Mui Yoon, did you refer to the staff of the Star as being one of “decency, integrity or competence”. I’m not sure because your punctuation marks around those traits actually implies sarcasm on your part.

      Chin Mui Yoon, do you understand what I just wrote? I’m worried you might misunderstand me, seeing that you are a reporter with The Star and seeing that the last sentence of your comment above is grammatically erroneous.

      Anyways, to make thing simple, what I mean to say is : The Star is a newspaper fit only to be used to rub the shit off my ass after a round of Mexican food. Any other use for it would be pointless and giving it too much credit. Therefore, for the sake of your own reputation, please do not go out in public associating yourself with the Star because you’re own credibility will be shattered.

      I hope you can understand this.

    • Tecky permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 15:45:33 pm 15:45

      The Star’s employees may well be frustrated and it’s understandable that they’d be defensive and bleat about ‘unfairness’ or ‘sweeping statements’. But it’s a bit rich to expect the public who read (and presumably also buy) the paper to be ‘fair’ when the paper’s slant has been glaringly obvious – does it think it can behave like this and not have to face the consequences? And does the paper ever think whether it’s fair to the people and entities which are the subject of its (mis)reporting? Its loss of reputation and credibility is self-inflicted, really.
      One might argue that we should separate the writers from the owners. But a man is known by the company he keeps, is he not?

    • Allan Koay permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 15:58:30 pm 15:58

      hey Kim,
      Fareed Zakaria who wrote for CNN and Time was caught for plagiarism. So was Jonah Lehrer of The New Yorker. There are many more examples of plagiarism caught in major publications and minor ones too. Does this mean CNN, Time and The New Yorker have no “decency, integrity or competence”? The Star took action against the writer, as did CNN, Time and The New Yorker. When a writer plagiarises, sometimes it cannot be immediately detected. In one day, editors and sub-editors have so much to do, they do not have the time to sit around Googling and checking every sentence for plagiarism. More important is to check facts first. so, no, not every “decent editor or sub-editor … would have sensed what was going on.” As such, I fail to see how a writer’s, in this case a contributor’s, plagiarism reflects the “decency, integrity or competence” of a publication.

      Yes, like Mui Yoon, I am also a journalist with The Star.

    • Jeffrey permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 20:56:55 pm 20:56

      Allan, but of course you deem it alright just because others, as per examples of names and organizations you have so deligently supplied us, have done so.
      But let me tell you, two or multiples of wrongs, don’t and will never make this right!
      There must be originality in articles written. Does it make the article that Dawn has written any lesser in value if an acknowledgement is made to the original writer?
      Her sincerity is in question and God forbid, do we have to google every time she submits an article?
      I consider your defense of Dawn far from admirable – perhaps
      only taken because of your loyalty to the Star??

    • Kim permalink
      Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 22:40:08 pm 22:40

      Dear Allan Koay, it saddens me that your newspaper is keen to associate itself with CNN, Time and The New Yorker as far as plagiarism is concerned. To answer your question, Yes, CNN, Time and The New Yorker are deemed to have lost some of its decency, integrity or competency as a result of the actions of their staff. The same goes for your newspaper. Your newspaper took action against its contributor only after the latest copied article came to light, oblivious of the fact that more than a few past articles by the contributor were also done in a similar manner. With today’s technology available, the editors or sub-editors could have at least browsed through or ‘googled’ past articles relating to the subject matter to spot similarities. This is where the question of their integrity and competency comes in. After all, it is the actions or inactions of the people working for any such company or organization which would reflect the decency, integrity or competency of such company or organization. Cheers.

  6. Jeffrey permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 01:01:11 am 01:01

    Shame! Shame and Shame on you Dawn. Just as well you found a thrashy newspaper to print it!!

  7. jordan permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 02:03:17 am 02:03

    Article appearing on Saturday April 21, 2012, entitled, ‘Finding your perfect abode
    LIVE THE MOMENT By DAWN JEREMIAH ” is a word by word take with this article published online on Jun 12, 2010 entitled “How Not to Buy Your First Home
    Seven Lessons I Had to Learn the Hard Way contributed by online via http://voices.yahoo.com/how-not-buy-first-home-6187170.html?cat=54

  8. insomniac permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 16:27:45 pm 16:27

    Expect more from a person being paid to write for The Star. But copying almost word-for-word without citing the source its just plain theft.

  9. PeeP_SqueaK permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 18:42:07 pm 18:42

    How could anyone face society after being caught for such heinous journalism crime?

    Is she still employed by the Star?

  10. Chloe Lee permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 21:45:39 pm 21:45

    Dear Allan Koay,

    Let’s look at what is being compromised here.

    1. Original thought.
    In this pen to paper profession where ideas, words and effectiveness of communication are the main things that distinguishes one writer from the next, these are then the areas you need to protect; if not for larger scheme of things, at least for your own livelihood. I see you’re into poetry Mr Koay? Then surely you would flip if some dregs of the society, who have so little thoughts to call their own, claims your Untitled (2008) poem as theirs? Poor Hannah Stark, who may have had to do hours of research, days out there looking at actual property, lunches spent talking to people, hours putting it down in writing, and a team of people to proofread and scrutinize her article. How many days did this article spent being Dawn Jeremiah’s property? How many people were deceived?

    2. Your paper’s role as the nation’s leading newspaper
    If one represents a religious body, they would be careful of how they depict the sanctity of life, and the implications of the ending of life. If one is a representative of an art museum, each piece of art acquired for the gallery and every comment made on art outside the museum, should be well thought out and of tact. The Star is like a curator of words. It is impossible to put on this huge role, and not accept the responsibility that comes with it. Why is “punishing” Dawn Jeremiah not enough? Error number one, The Star waited to be tipped off rather than doing regular enough checks to find rot in the work handed in by someone you pay to write, and technically employ. Error number two, The Star did not do regular enough checks to know that Dawn Jeremiah was plagiarizing. Let’s take a look at her resume (http://my.linkedin.com/in/dawnjeremiah). Is there enough on there to tell us that she can produce good pieces of writing? Is there enough on there to tell us that she will have no difficulty in coming up with content for writing? Error number three, The Star does not know Dawn Jeremiah. For goodness’ sake. I have worked with coursemates, friends, and colleagues. Each time, if I am put in the position of responsibility in collating and editing, first instinct that kicks in is always matching the writing to the person I know. Are they capable of these ideas? Are they capable of using language in this manner?

    With all that said, what irks me the most is still, people who are trying to downplay the severity of a crime like plagiarism. It was horrifying enough to spend four years in a public university, working on assignments with people who have so little regard for the skill of thinking. To think that, in the real world, big players like you, Allan, would blindly devote yourself to being defensive. You know what the difference is between this incident and all the other major publications you have mentioned? They apologised, and were ashamed, and bore the huge black blotch their negligence caused.

  11. Jenny permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-5 @ MYT 22:50:53 pm 22:50

    Dear Allan Koay, when Fareed Zakaria was caught, CNN came out with a public statement. When Jonah Lehrer was found guilty of self plagiarising, The New Yorker came out with a public statement. Jonah Lehrer’s articles can still be seen on The New Yorker website but with the editor’s note listing where the articles were previously published.

    Dawn Jeremiah’s plagiarised articles can still be seen on your newspapers online edition. There has been no statement from the editors or the management of The Star.

    Pray tell then how you can compare The Star to CNN, Time and The New Yorker? Tak malu ke you ni?

    Disclaimer: I’m not a writer but I buy The Star everyday. Maybe I should stop.

    • Tiffa permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 10:48:25 am 10:48

      Yes, I posted this on The Star Online facebook and asked them to explain, guess what my comments was deleted within 2 seconds. So i guess they just want to sweep this under carpet. Maybe I should paste this on NST Online FB page instead? lol.

      And, to Allan Koay, Even if your internet white knight instinct telling us that is not the publication’s fault its the writer herself. Why is The Star keeping mum about this?

  12. Hmmmm permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 08:08:35 am 08:08

    A little bird told me that she’s being asked to keep a vow of silence and not share her side of the story

  13. Allan permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 08:21:53 am 08:21

    I have absolutely no idea how my comment could be seen as defending the writer or defending plagiarism, or even comparing The Star to CNN, Time or New Yorker. This is very weird, as I was only defending the way editors and sub-editors work and comparing similar situations.
    As such I have requested for the moderator to remove my first comment. I don’t want anything to be further misconstrued.

    • uppercaise permalink*
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 12:49:50 pm 12:49

      Comments are usually not deleted unless they are abusive or defamatory. To delete your original comment would leave a gaping hole with no reference point for the remarks by others, so I’ll leave it as it is. Forum conversations tend to have a life of their own and meander off in all directions. You can’t control other people’s perceptions of what you meant. Let it ride.

    • lennonist permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 14:01:05 pm 14:01

      Dear Allan,

      I wholeheartedly agree with your disbelief that there are people trying to compare The Star with CNN, Time and New Yorker. It’s quite preposterous that a government owned media with biased reporting can be compared to these bedrocks of journalism.

      But when you say you fail to see how a writer’s plagiarism reflects the “decency, integrity or competence” of a publication as you did in your first comment, then I can understand at last why you are continued to be employed by the Star.

      Anything else?

    • Tiffa permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 17:00:49 pm 17:00

      “Plagiarism happens everywhere even in the world’s biggest newspapers”, oh so it’s okay to do so until you get caught? That does sound familiar.

    • Kim permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 18:02:17 pm 18:02

      Dear Allan, I do not think that your comment has been misconstrued by the readers here. In fact, your explanation to defend the indefensible has been made perfectly clear. Have some faith in yourself, you are after all, a media man.

  14. Renee Choong permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 08:53:11 am 08:53

    Dear Haters,

    Please don’t paint everyone with the same brush. I have worked in The Star for many years and worked side by side with Chin Mui Yoon, who was my junior, and also Allan Koay. Hence, I can vouch for these 2 persons; brilliant writers with an exceptional flair (even I can’t write better than them even though I was a senior), hardworking and most importantly have good ethics. In general, The Star has good and ethical journalists working there, but I can’t say the same for some editors and those in the management level. Some of them have been there for far too long. hence basking in their comfort zone. I have to deduce is the editor’s responsibilty to check the copy before going out to print. Yes, you critics are entitled to your comments but please do so with some reservations for those who have served well in the media. Bear some thought for writers who have fought for public’s rights and those who have gone the extra mile to write an investigative piece which probably have made a difference to YOU, your family and the nation at large. Plagiarism happens everywhere even in the world’s biggest newspapers (has said by Allan too). If the column has been axed, the accused has been reprimanded or expelled, and if The Star has issued an apology and has learned from this, then do accept these actions in good faith.

    But, if all these steps still fail to appease you all, then STOP reading or buying The Star to justify your statements. If not, you will have to eat your own words.

    ex-Star journalist – Renee Choong

    • lennonist permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 14:20:09 pm 14:20

      Dear Renee,

      I love how you generalize and stereotype the anti-Star commentators as “haters”. Anyways, you sound very apologetic for the Star. It’s ok, we understand reporters need to cari makan also. Obviously, since you’re an ex-Star journalist now, there is a less conflicted way to earn money.

      See, we “haters”(of biased, fabricated journalism) can sympathize with you “lovers”(of biased, fabricated journalism) too.

      Oh wait, did I just generalise and stereotype?

      ex-Star reader – Ai Saw Wat U Deed Deh

    • Tiffa permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 16:56:21 pm 16:56

      Yes, I am a hater of plagiarism, does that make you a lover? :o)

    • Kim permalink
      Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 11:28:39 am 11:28

      I do not wish to deviate from the real issue here. But as wisely put by the moderator of this blog: ‘Forum conversations tend to have a life of their own and meander off in all directions’. What I wish to state is that some journalists from the newspaper in question, past and present, tend to be prone to name calling. One sarcastically called some of us here “brave souls”, another, “Haters”. What have we done to deserve this? For not agreeing with them that plagiarism is a norm in the profession and therefore alright?

  15. Anonymous permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 10:34:08 am 10:34

    Just my observations as a reader. For Malaysia to progress, the country needs a better English paper than The Star. Some worrying pointers about what goes into their editorial policies:

    – Unwilling to name companies which are being reported in unfavourable circumstances (which other publications have no qualms about doing).

    – No unfavourable articles about major advertisers: eg Maxis (other publications have liberally published these without fear or favour)

    – Parading thrash in ‘Other News’ section (the triple Datuk shows his Daily Chilli pedigree)

    – Rehashing press releases (paste-and-copy reporting) with double-checking or value-add.

    Plus many other points which point to an organization unsuitable to be flag bearer of printed news and opinions for a country which aspire to be world class. Unfortunately, the other English papers are not good enough (though NST has been a bit improving lately) to provide The Star with the (quality) competition that it so desperately needs.

  16. Anonymous permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 10:48:26 am 10:48

    am obviously not a journalist but a reader: type: (copy-and-paste reporting).

  17. Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 12:45:46 pm 12:45

    Do the snatch and theft accident that happen to her is plagiarized as well?make to believe accident?another case of publicity stunt?another Paris Hilton in the making?

  18. Another Anon permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 16:32:28 pm 16:32

    Before everyone starts shooting me – I don’t read The Star except online or if its free. 😀

    I have never read Dawn’s column until she started writing about the interview series few months back and I actually thought that those articles were good , that perhaps her writing skills improved. Of course, now I found out it’s otherwise.

    I agree with everyone’s opinion that plagiarism is wrong and this should not happen on a national paper. But I wouldn’t go as far to imply that everyone who works for Star has lost its decency or competency. I mean its not fair to say that just because of one bad apple, the whole crate of apples is bad, right?
    Sure, someone screwed up big time at The Star and that someone (or a few someones) have to take responsibility and be accountable for this mistake.

    And this is where the real problem is for me. Accountability. From what I’ve seen, The Star’s management has not done anything to publicly to address this issue. (not sure if they have?) This is typical Malaysian style lah. Sweep everything under the carpet – the public will forget this in 3-2-1. Memory reboot. Bah.

    As Renee Choong said there are good, credible journalists and contributors in The Star. Marina Mahathir for example. Let’s not forget the effort of these genuine journalists/writers who work hard to get news and opinions to us.

    • uppercaise permalink*
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 16:51:36 pm 16:51

      Marina Mahathir is a contributor.

    • rom nain permalink
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 17:42:37 pm 17:42

      Naughty, naughty, uppercaise. Are you implying then that there are no `good, credible journalists’ in the Star? No need to answer, seriously.

    • uppercaise permalink*
      Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 20:36:02 pm 20:36

      gosh, Rom, however did you reach that conclusion? Heh.

  19. RgD2 permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 21:25:21 pm 21:25

    I shudder at the thought of what repercussions this misjudgement would have on a doctor instead of a journalist.

  20. JanjiDicapati permalink
    Thu 2012-Sep-6 @ MYT 23:25:01 pm 23:25

    Sigh* Who read this rubbish paper nowadays anyway?

    • uppercaise permalink*
      Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 01:53:27 am 01:53

      About 2mil people, according to Neilsen Research.

  21. Marple Graxlax permalink
    Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 11:09:24 am 11:09

    The Star is not a real news agency. It’s just a government mouthpiece that buys a lot of stories from syndicates. Too many of their own stuff is made up of fluff and propaganda. The paper itself is bulked with too many advertisements.

  22. Hamish Stapleton permalink
    Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 11:15:44 am 11:15

    Typical of Star reporters. Instead of taking an approach of humility, they puff up with pride and go on the defensive. This incident tarnishes the entire organisation, so don’t bullshit about bad apples. Of course, this would be the enlightened approach of a true news agency with responsibility to the public. So it’s no surprise with the stroke fest and mutual defending by so-called reporters from and formerly from The Star.

  23. Irene Kiew permalink
    Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 17:35:22 pm 17:35

    To those who believe the Star journalists are defending plagiarism: They are not. Do you think they aren’t angry too? This incident damages the paper’s reputation, and all the Star journalists’ reputation by association. But if I read Allan correctly, he is saying that the editors should not be blamed for not realising that huge chunks of the column were plagiarised. Come on, how do you expect an editor to automatically know when a writer includes text taken from somewhere else? He is not God. He wouldn’t know unless he had already read it elsewhere or he took pains to google various phrases to see if there is a match — or if someone were to discover it and point it out to him, as has happened in this case.

    Absolutely, what Dawn did was indefensible. I’m also a former journalist from The Star. If someone had lifted my words and published them somewhere else under their name, I would be livid! However, to denounce the whole paper and all its journalists just because of one columnist is taking things a bit too far. (Now if you want to talk about biased reporting, I wouldn’t quibble with you… but that’s another matter altogether and a discussion for another time and place.)

  24. Fri 2012-Sep-7 @ MYT 22:28:58 pm 22:28

    I do read the star, but the headlines only. One look at the headlines is enough to gauge the the bullshit in the rest of the articles.
    The only part that carries the truth is the comics section.
    Shame, Shame, Shame

  25. Kenny permalink
    Wed 2012-Sep-12 @ MYT 13:53:36 pm 13:53

    The media is not impartial because it has to report to the bosses. Biases, especially in reporting political issues, are very evident, more so in some papers than others. The licenses are renewed every year, so they have to tow the line. Is there total freedom to truly write ethically in all honesty in journalism? I do not believe so. I have started to distrust the papers to the extent that I prefer to read the advertisements and the classified section.

    The rot starts from the head. If you do not want to be part of the rot, don’t stay there. But then again, without a job, one cannot survive in our current economic situation. So, people always justify their actions and compromise on their stand. It is better to keep quiet than to defend what is wrong. But I do agree that it is wrong to paint everyone with the same brush.

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  1. Dawn Jeremiah Plagiarized Work In The Star Column Exposed | Happenings In Malaysia
  2. MCA should just sell DAP the plagiarizing Star « Helen Ang

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